April 2018

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October 2015

Houston Bike Challenge Inspiring Company Teams to Compete for Prizes, Trip to New Zealand

Show your support for cycling; join this fun contest for riders of all abilities

With apologies to Freddie Mercury, workplaces that encourage their staff this November to “Get on your bikes and ride!” could find themselves pedaling to win a New Zealand trip, a new bicycle, cycling gear or other great prizes.

It’s part of the “Love to Ride” Houston Bike Challenge – a friendly competition that welcomes riders of all abilities. Brought to you by The Energy Corridor District, Bike Houston and the international Love to Ride organization, the challenge is designed to entice workplaces to get more people to ride their bikes, whether for commuting, fitness or just for fun.

Workplaces with the highest percentage of staff riding in November (participating across seven size categories) can win team prizes. Company teams go head-to-head by tracking rides for the live, online league at www.lovetoride.net/houston. New prizes are being added all the time, and you can check out the list here.

So far, competition among Energy Corridor companies is heating up. Some of The Energy Corridor teams that are ready to ride include AIA Engineers, BP, CITGO, ConocoPhillips, Diamond Offshore Drilling, Memorial Athletic Club, Shell, Sysco Corporation, Wells Fargo and, naturally, The Energy Corridor District, which has long developed bicycling-friendly programs as a way to improve health, traffic congestion and air quality.

Employees from several other Houston-area organizations plan to jump on their bikes for the challenge, by riding to work, around a park or even to the corner store. See the Houston Love to Ride teams registered so far here.

“It’s free, anyone can join and the payoff is big, not just for great prizes, but also for fitness, well-being and simply the joy of pedaling yourself anyplace you like,” explains Kelly Rector, transportation coordinator for The District. “Everyone can take part. It doesn’t matter if you haven’t been on a bike for years, you only need to ride for 10 minutes or more to be eligible to win prizes.”

On the Love to Ride website, riders are connecting with other cyclists and offering encouragement. “I’m hoping this ‘Love to Ride’ will help me to get back in the saddle and connect (with) other riders,” wrote one rider in a post used to encourage another participant.

Houston is one of five United States cities selected for the Love to Ride program, which has helped 40 percent of non-cyclists start biking weekly, according to Love to Ride.

“We’re seeing companies use the Love to Ride challenge as a free team-building program,” says Rector. “More employees biking can make for a healthier staff and fewer sick days, which preserves both health and money. It’s also a way to demonstrate your organization’s commitment to sustainability.”

Here’s how to hop in the saddle for this competition and the drawing for prizes. Just encourage your employees to take part and ride. Bicyclists register online and keep track of their rides, which increases an organization’s score.

Registering for Love to Ride, says Rector, is also an opportunity to explore the more than 50 miles of trails in The Energy Corridor or try commuting to work using The District’s vetted bike commuting routes.

“It’s a perfect time of the year to get back on your bike, have some fun and experience firsthand why so many people in Houston are taking up riding,” Rector says.

Sign up today here.

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Houston Bike Challenge Inspiring Company Teams to Compete for Prizes, Trip to New Zealand
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Get Ready to Keep Hazardous E-waste from Being Trashed: Energy Corridor Recycles Day is Nov. 14!
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ECD Wins “Long Range Planning” Award from American Planning Assoc.-Texas Chapter
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